36 posts tagged art

4th July 2014

Made with Code is an initiative launched by Google to champion creativity, girls, and code.

The movement is designed to do three things: To inspire girls by celebrating women and girls who are using code to do great things; to engage girls to try coding through introductory projects and resources; and to sustain their interest by creating alliances and community around girls and coding.

Google is also collaborating with Code School to allow thousands of women and minorities everywhere to expand their skills. Through this online application you can get a free 3-month subscription to Code School. This opportunity is available to all traditionally underrepresented groups in technology (including, but not limited to, African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, persons with disabilities, women and veterans).

Also check out this series of videos they shot which highlights inspiring women in tech, including Danielle Feinberg of Pixar, Erica Kochi of UNICEF, Limor Fried of Adafruit, and Maddy Maxey of Crated.

5th January 2014
“DIY is DESIGN IT YOURSELF. It’s absolutely NO FEAR. If you can’t fucking do it, LEARN HOW. You have to go out there and make it happen. You have to bullshit your way to any situation you can. If you don’t know how to design a house, it doesn’t matter. You know what to do. It’s inside of you.”

An awesome talk by Kate Moross who is coming out with a book for young artists and designers called Make Your Own Luck: A DIY Attitude to Graphic Design and Illustration

28th October 2013
By Michele Brautnick on April 15, 2011
For the past few weeks I’ve been tidying up my office at the end of every day just in case I don’t come back for another 10 weeks. Some might call it nesting. I call it being considerate of my colleagues who might need to sift through my things while I’m away on maternity leave.
During one of these nightly purges I ran across a “keepsake”– a 15-year old copy of a destroyed, then restored, Post-it note from one of my college professors. Destroyed out of anger and likely embarrassment, then restored after I realized, “Shit. She might be right.”
This tough-love note has tagged along with me from job to job, and has lived on my bookshelves for the last 11 years at Peopledesign. And whenever we have an office-cleaning day I find it, read it, make a fresh copy, and tuck it back into my keeper file. And then I quietly say thanks to that professor who didn’t worry about hurting my feelings.
Shortly after the most recent unearthing of the “keepsake”, this HOW article was yammered by Gina, along with the following comment: “Will someone write a better ‘Things Young Designer’s Need to Know.’ I’m sick of seeing things like ‘make mistakes’ and ‘be yourself’. What about, ‘there is such a thing as bad rags’.”
I happen to agree with much of what the folks at id29 have written. But if I read between the lines of Gina’s comment, what I’m really hearing is the desire for a give-it-to-me straight approach to mentoring. And given my attachment to a raggedy college-era Post-it note, it seems obvious that I agree with her. This can be an effective method. So I’ve asked for help from the rest of my Peopledesign cronies to create our own list of words-to-the-wise. After all, they’re the ones that have taken their time to nudge, shape, and lovingly bully me into being a better designer, so who better to ask? Here goes:

Forget about what you did at school. It doesn’t matter.


Come up with great ideas and learn how to realize them.


Attitude is everything.


Get out of your own way.


Exist to make your employers’ lives easier, not harder.


Don’t be ruled by the grid. (See #12. I never said we always agree.)


Always sketch the boss’s idea first before moving onto your own.


Great projects won’t be handed to you – make your projects great.


Every project is an opportunity to learn something.


Stay fresh – if you’re on auto pilot, get into another field (you’ll be happier).


Learn what it was like to design not using a computer.


Learning to use grids effectively can make your life easier and your design better.


Art may be your muse, but business is your friend.


Don’t try to be original, try to be really great.


Make friends with copywriters.


Be punctual.


If you have free time ask if there’s something you could be helping with. If there isn’t anything, clean.


Don’t rule out an idea without trying it first.


Don’t edit your sketches before reviewing with your design lead. Edit together.


Work is not personal.


Art is personal expression. Design is solving business problems.


Anticipate next steps.


You don’t know it all, so don’t pretend to. Truth is, we don’t know it all either.


Admit your weaknesses. But being a team-player better not be one of them.


Be comfortable being part of a support system. Prove your worth and you’ll be recognized for your contributions and awarded with more responsibility.


Be reliable.


Have an opinion. And be open to other people’s opinions.


Explore, explore, explore. Edit later.


Practice articulating your thoughts. If the execution is weak, a good idea could be cut if you’re unable to explain your approach.


Get a hobby.

By Michele Brautnick on April 15, 2011

For the past few weeks I’ve been tidying up my office at the end of every day just in case I don’t come back for another 10 weeks. Some might call it nesting. I call it being considerate of my colleagues who might need to sift through my things while I’m away on maternity leave.

During one of these nightly purges I ran across a “keepsake”– a 15-year old copy of a destroyed, then restored, Post-it note from one of my college professors. Destroyed out of anger and likely embarrassment, then restored after I realized, “Shit. She might be right.”

This tough-love note has tagged along with me from job to job, and has lived on my bookshelves for the last 11 years at Peopledesign. And whenever we have an office-cleaning day I find it, read it, make a fresh copy, and tuck it back into my keeper file. And then I quietly say thanks to that professor who didn’t worry about hurting my feelings.

Shortly after the most recent unearthing of the “keepsake”, this HOW article was yammered by Gina, along with the following comment: “Will someone write a better ‘Things Young Designer’s Need to Know.’ I’m sick of seeing things like ‘make mistakes’ and ‘be yourself’. What about, ‘there is such a thing as bad rags’.”

I happen to agree with much of what the folks at id29 have written. But if I read between the lines of Gina’s comment, what I’m really hearing is the desire for a give-it-to-me straight approach to mentoring. And given my attachment to a raggedy college-era Post-it note, it seems obvious that I agree with her. This can be an effective method. So I’ve asked for help from the rest of my Peopledesign cronies to create our own list of words-to-the-wise. After all, they’re the ones that have taken their time to nudge, shape, and lovingly bully me into being a better designer, so who better to ask? Here goes:

  1. Forget about what you did at school. It doesn’t matter.

  2. Come up with great ideas and learn how to realize them.

  3. Attitude is everything.

  4. Get out of your own way.

  5. Exist to make your employers’ lives easier, not harder.

  6. Don’t be ruled by the grid. (See #12. I never said we always agree.)

  7. Always sketch the boss’s idea first before moving onto your own.

  8. Great projects won’t be handed to you – make your projects great.

  9. Every project is an opportunity to learn something.

  10. Stay fresh – if you’re on auto pilot, get into another field (you’ll be happier).

  11. Learn what it was like to design not using a computer.

  12. Learning to use grids effectively can make your life easier and your design better.

  13. Art may be your muse, but business is your friend.

  14. Don’t try to be original, try to be really great.

  15. Make friends with copywriters.

  16. Be punctual.

  17. If you have free time ask if there’s something you could be helping with. If there isn’t anything, clean.

  18. Don’t rule out an idea without trying it first.

  19. Don’t edit your sketches before reviewing with your design lead. Edit together.

  20. Work is not personal.

  21. Art is personal expression. Design is solving business problems.

  22. Anticipate next steps.

  23. You don’t know it all, so don’t pretend to. Truth is, we don’t know it all either.

  24. Admit your weaknesses. But being a team-player better not be one of them.

  25. Be comfortable being part of a support system. Prove your worth and you’ll be recognized for your contributions and awarded with more responsibility.

  26. Be reliable.

  27. Have an opinion. And be open to other people’s opinions.

  28. Explore, explore, explore. Edit later.

  29. Practice articulating your thoughts. If the execution is weak, a good idea could be cut if you’re unable to explain your approach.

  30. Get a hobby.

19th July 2013

A ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality.

His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the “quantity” group: fifty pound of pots rated an “A”, forty pounds a “B”, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot — albeit a perfect one — to get an “A”.

Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity.

It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work — and learning from their mistakes — the “quality” group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking

Just make.

(Source: superamit)

Reblogged from : jacob
7th June 2013
My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;) My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;) My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;) My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;) My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;)

My sister and I attended a screenprinting workshop at Kid Icarus a few weeks back. It turned out to be a great learning experience! Not to mention we got to hang out at their awesome shop in Kensington Market and met Lourdes who bought us sweet Mexican bread for lunch.

We also liked that there was an emphasis on learning how to do everything at home. It’s only a matter of time before we set up our own mini screen printing operation ;)

14th May 2013
Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly… Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…
Gary Taxali was here
Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…
a creepy/cool sound installation
Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly… Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…
Yes, there were pugcakes and yes, they were delicious
Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly… Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…
Material Art & Design students be killin it
Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club
Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…
the best.

Just a couple of unedited snapshots from some shows I visited within the past few months.

First row: Do you want to hear a story? Yes, I want to hear a story @ OCADU Student Gallery

Second row: Lost in the Memory Palace: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller @ Art Gallery of Ontario

Third row: The Mr Pickles Fan Club Gemma Correll Solo Exhibition @ Magic Pony - see more coverage at Amanda’s blog

Fourth row: OCAD University Grad Ex 2013

Other events not pictured: The Game of Thrones exhibit @ DX and The Mass Exodus fashion show @ Ryerson. Didn’t go to TCAF this year, sadly…

11th December 2012
My two friends Kevin and Jordan recently collaborated to start a fashion blog called Twins in Town. It’s unique in that they bring their own talents to the table; Kevin posts his illustrations and paintings while Jordan uses the blog to document his adventures in the realm of styling.

I got to help them out with their custom blogspot layout as well as other general website stuff like obtaining a domain name and integrating social media profiles into the blog.

So far their posts have been exceptional and I’m so excited to see where it’s headed. Make sure you give them a visit! My two friends Kevin and Jordan recently collaborated to start a fashion blog called Twins in Town. It’s unique in that they bring their own talents to the table; Kevin posts his illustrations and paintings while Jordan uses the blog to document his adventures in the realm of styling.

I got to help them out with their custom blogspot layout as well as other general website stuff like obtaining a domain name and integrating social media profiles into the blog.

So far their posts have been exceptional and I’m so excited to see where it’s headed. Make sure you give them a visit!

My two friends Kevin and Jordan recently collaborated to start a fashion blog called Twins in Town. It’s unique in that they bring their own talents to the table; Kevin posts his illustrations and paintings while Jordan uses the blog to document his adventures in the realm of styling.

I got to help them out with their custom blogspot layout as well as other general website stuff like obtaining a domain name and integrating social media profiles into the blog.

So far their posts have been exceptional and I’m so excited to see where it’s headed. Make sure you give them a visit!

16th August 2012
Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines is another great book to add to any designer’s arsenal.

It’s an extremely helpful guide to manoeuvring through the business aspects of the creative field and answers common questions such as, “How should I price my work?”, “What’s the deal with copyright?”, and the dreaded “How do I make a contract?” (contract templates are included in the the book).

I really wish this was part of every art school’s syllabus because it’s just that useful. At least I know what to get all my designer and illustrator friends for Christmas this year. Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines is another great book to add to any designer’s arsenal.

It’s an extremely helpful guide to manoeuvring through the business aspects of the creative field and answers common questions such as, “How should I price my work?”, “What’s the deal with copyright?”, and the dreaded “How do I make a contract?” (contract templates are included in the the book).

I really wish this was part of every art school’s syllabus because it’s just that useful. At least I know what to get all my designer and illustrator friends for Christmas this year. Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines is another great book to add to any designer’s arsenal.

It’s an extremely helpful guide to manoeuvring through the business aspects of the creative field and answers common questions such as, “How should I price my work?”, “What’s the deal with copyright?”, and the dreaded “How do I make a contract?” (contract templates are included in the the book).

I really wish this was part of every art school’s syllabus because it’s just that useful. At least I know what to get all my designer and illustrator friends for Christmas this year. Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines is another great book to add to any designer’s arsenal.

It’s an extremely helpful guide to manoeuvring through the business aspects of the creative field and answers common questions such as, “How should I price my work?”, “What’s the deal with copyright?”, and the dreaded “How do I make a contract?” (contract templates are included in the the book).

I really wish this was part of every art school’s syllabus because it’s just that useful. At least I know what to get all my designer and illustrator friends for Christmas this year.

Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines is another great book to add to any designer’s arsenal.

It’s an extremely helpful guide to manoeuvring through the business aspects of the creative field and answers common questions such as, “How should I price my work?”, “What’s the deal with copyright?”, and the dreaded “How do I make a contract?” (contract templates are included in the the book).

I really wish this was part of every art school’s syllabus because it’s just that useful. At least I know what to get all my designer and illustrator friends for Christmas this year.

(Source: hazel)

30th March 2012
Nothing like being able to get a 360º view inside the Sistine Chapel—complete with background choir music—to renew one’s faith in mankind and the internet. I highly recommend you set your browser to full-view to get the full breadth of Michaelangelo’s masterpiece. Use your arrowkeys and control/shift buttons to move about.

It’s incredible how this has been preserved for so long. Look at that anatomy, those colours, and how he fully integrates the architecture into his painting. Gah!

I actually think this might be better than being there in person, what with those tourists crowding the chapel and all.

Nothing like being able to get a 360º view inside the Sistine Chapel—complete with background choir music—to renew one’s faith in mankind and the internet. I highly recommend you set your browser to full-view to get the full breadth of Michaelangelo’s masterpiece. Use your arrowkeys and control/shift buttons to move about.

It’s incredible how this has been preserved for so long. Look at that anatomy, those colours, and how he fully integrates the architecture into his painting. Gah!

I actually think this might be better than being there in person, what with those tourists crowding the chapel and all.

22nd March 2012
Those who know me in real life know that I am crazy about anything nautical-themed. So much so that my most worn pieces of clothing are, by far, my numerous striped tops and my good ol’ trusty navy blazer (complete with gold anchor buttons). I even have a captain’s hat that I throw on during Halloween.

Naturally, I created this huge set on Svpply called Nautical Nonsense. It’s a carefully compiled collection of all things nautical, from accessories and menswear to books and home decor, and it’s still growing. For anyone having difficulty getting me a gift, you know where to go.

Those who know me in real life know that I am crazy about anything nautical-themed. So much so that my most worn pieces of clothing are, by far, my numerous striped tops and my good ol’ trusty navy blazer (complete with gold anchor buttons). I even have a captain’s hat that I throw on during Halloween.

Naturally, I created this huge set on Svpply called Nautical Nonsense. It’s a carefully compiled collection of all things nautical, from accessories and menswear to books and home decor, and it’s still growing. For anyone having difficulty getting me a gift, you know where to go.